Monthly Archives: May 2018

Information Doctor For Telemedicine In The State

1. Telemedicine Can Easily Treat Many Common Conditions

Many large telemedicine providers offer online care services to people living or visiting Hawaii, but more often than not those physicians are not physically located in Hawaii. Access to a doctor that resides in the state is especially important because there are many specific conditions and illnesses that are far more common in Hawaii than on the mainland. Evolving over 70 million years ago in nearly complete isolation, more than 90{d837ca6709e313b0e618339a08fa71a93512a2eb6d5655964ba3905cca18112e} of the State’s native flora is found only in the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaii is home to plants, animals, and foods that either do not exist elsewhere in the world or are extremely rare. For example, if a visitor hiking Hawaii Volcano National Park touched a nettles plant and then experienced an allergic reaction on their skin, a mainland doctor might easily conclude it was a bug bite, heat rash, or other topical problem.

Incorrectly diagnosing the problem can lead to additional healthcare problems for the patient including fever, the rash spreading, or even more serious illnesses and staff infections. Seeing a Hawaii located doctor online can increase the likelihood of a correct diagnosis because the doctor is more likely to be aware of skin conditions brought on by indigenous species.

2. Understanding The Lingo

Many local residents speak Pidgin, a special dialect of English that originated on Hawaii’s sugarcane plantations. Examples, “Shoots brah we go cruise when you pau hana,” which means “Let’s hang out when you’re off work.” Or, “Ho deez grinds is broke da mout,” which means “This food tastes delicious.” A doctor who doesn’t live in Hawaii could easily misunderstand what the patient was saying, which could create problems with diagnosing the patient’s medical condition. Picking a Hawaii licensed, Hawaii located doctor ensures that the patient and doctor are literally speaking the same language. This increases the likelihood of a correct diagnosis at the earliest stages.

3. Location Location Location

Finally, seeing a Hawaii located doctor online can help with prescription fulfillment or future care needs for the patient. After a telemedicine appointment concludes the doctor will ask the patient which pharmacy they’d like to pick up medications from. In Hawaii, many streets have Hawaiian names that are difficult for a doctor not living in Hawaii to spell or identify because they sound very similar, ex. Waipio verses Waipahu. A Hawaii located doctor will quickly be able to identify where the closest pharmacy to the patient is located ensure that the medicine arrives there as fast as possible. In addition to pharmacy locations, if the physician determines that the patient may require in-person medical care, they can recommend a local Primary Care Physician, Specialist, or the closest urgent care for follow-up. For critical situations, a Hawaii located physician can recommend the local hospital best equipped to address the patient’s medical conditions.

For immediate diagnosis and treatment, having access to a doctor from everywhere you happen to be via telemedicine offers potentially life-saving benefits. But whether you live in or travel through Hawaii, you do not have to settle for a doctor who could be anywhere when you can access a Hawaii located physician.

Information Trans Fat Ban Tied to Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes

New York residents have benefited from rules that ban trans fat in restaurants: Rates of heart attack and stroke have dropped in New York counties where such bans have been enacted, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that starting three years after the effort to restrict the use of trans fats in eating establishments was introduced, the New York counties with these restrictions experienced a 6.2 percent reduction in hospital admissions for heart attacks and strokes, compared with New York counties without similar restrictions.

This translates to 43 fewer heart attacks and strokes per 100,000 adult residents (ages 25 and older) in the New York counties with trans fat restrictions, according to the study published online today (April 12) in the journal JAMA Cardiology.

The 6.2 percent decline in cardiovascular events found in the new study fell within the bounds of what other researchers have found in their estimates, said the study’s lead author, Dr. Eric Brandt, a cardiovascular disease fellow at the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

One previous estimate, from 2009, predicted that nearly eliminating trans fat from people’s diets could prevent between 6 and 19 percent of heart disease hospitalizations.

However, the limitations on trans fat that the researchers looked at in this new study are not entirely comprehensive, Brandt told Live Science. The restrictions apply to trans fat in New York restaurants, bakeries, cafeterias, caterers, senior-meal programs and other food-service locations, but they do not apply to food sold in grocery stores, he said.

The decline in cardiovascular events observed in this study is promising, and suggests that similar if not greater decreases in heart attack and stroke rates could be seen when the Food and Drug Administration’s nationwide restriction on trans fat goes into effect in 2018, Brandt said.

The FDA restrictions on trans fat will prevent manufacturers and food preparers from using partially hydrogenated oils, which contain these unhealthy fats, in foods. These measures will nearly eliminate trans fat in grocery stores and will ban them from eateries across the country.

Although food companies have been gradually eliminating trans fat from their products in preparation for the FDA’s ban, partially hydrogenated oils are still a part of people’s diets. The oils are found in baked goods, fried foods, yeast breads, chips, crackers and margarine, the study authors wrote.

Studies have suggested that people with higher levels of trans fat in their diets are at greater risk for stroke and cardiovascular disease.

New York City first introduced restrictions on trans fat in eating establishments in July 2007, and similar actions were initiated in 11 counties in New York state between 2007 and 2011.

In the study, the researchers analyzed data on hospital admission rates for heart attacks and stroke over an 11-year period, from 2002 to 2013. The study period covered about five years before and after the restrictions took effect. The researchers compared the hospitalization rates for heart attacks and stroke in adults ages 25 and older in the 11 New York counties with restrictions on trans fat, with the hospitalization rates for these cardiovascular problems in 25 New York counties without restrictions.

Rates of heart attack and stroke were already declining in New York state before the trans fat restrictions, the study authors noted. However, after 2006, the analysis found that populations in counties with the ban experienced additional declines beyond what would have been expected based on the existing downward trends.

The study found that declines in heart attacks and strokes within the areas of the ban became apparent three or more years after trans fat was restricted in the county’s eateries.

It usually takes a few years for this kind of dietary modification to reduce cardiovascular disease risk enough to be measurable, Brandt said.

He expects that when the FDA restrictions on trans fat get implemented next year on all foods, a continued decline in heart attacks and strokes will be seen in the New York counties that had already limited the use of these fats in restaurants.

There are likely to be further measurable differences in heart attack and stroke rates, especially among younger age groups, who may benefit by spending an even longer portion of their lives without trans fat in their diets, Brandt said.

Although it may be costly for food companies to reformulate their products to eliminate trans fat, this data suggests that by restricting trans fat in foods, there is a potential to improve the health of Americans and lessen the burden of cardiovascular disease, Brandt said.